Disappearing Ink

Chalk it up to a combination of weariness from decades of oversharing and embarrassment at the sheer volume of my own dumb past social media posts, but I finally snapped recently and moved to a much more ephemeral system (something that Snap and young people generally have been onto for quite some time).

In a nutshell, I’m treating House of Kyle (and the accompanying Junk Drawer newsletter) as my main hub/source of truth, and demoting third-party social media services to act as disposable spokes on that hub.

Here’s how it breaks down…

Instagram: I’ve archived all but a few posts (that I rotate out from time to time), and primarily just use Stories, which automatically disappear after 24 hours.

Facebook: I’m using my dormant account entirely to drive traffic to my blog and newsletter, with the great Jumbo service automatically deleting posts after 30 days.

Twitter: I’m still posting and liking content, but I’m now also using Jumbo here to delete tweets older than 30 days.

See you in the wind!

Bright Copper Kettles: More Favorites

A while back I did a couple posts outlining some of my favorite things (followed by a special ‘rona edition last year). It’s been a bit, so I thought I’d share a few new favorites:

Wyze Noise-Cancelling Headphones: I recently added this to my headphone lineup, and have been incredibly impressed (especially for the price)

Nintendo Game & Watch: Super Mario Bros.: A pure hit of nostalgia that I use for my bedside clock

HEY Email: Not for everyone, but it’s amazing

Tiger Tail Original: For rolling out rage

Loocid Anti-Fog Wipes: Works like a charm for grocery store runs

Oatly: I’d leave milk for it

Echo Wall Clock: Incredibly handy when cooking

The New Normal

As we start a new year with (once the death rattle shenanigans peter out) new leadership, it’s tempting to think that things will slowly start returning to normal. For the most part this will (hopefully) be true, but one of the many ripples of 2020 on American society has been a great “Band-Aid ripping” effect that’s caused many slow but inevitable changes to happen years before anticipated.

As a result, a lot of things are never snapping back into place. Here are my predictions for a few of them…

Commuting and remote work: While it’s possible that we start seeing permanent closures of physical offices (for jobs that allow it), we’ll almost certainly see a lot more flexibility for and acceptance of remote work for a significant portion of the workweek. Future generations will find it jaw-dropping that many people once filled a personal car with gasoline, only to drive to another location five days a week, sit there at a computer for hours, then drive back home.

Our interactions with stores and restaurants: Online/app-centered ordering, delivery services, curbside item pickups and digital in-restaurant menus are here to stay. Who knew that QR codes would finally have their moment?

New movie releases: With Warner Bros. already leading the way, we’ll see same-day streaming releases for new movies, with the number of movie theaters shrinking as the theatrical experience becomes more of a “few times a year” social experience. Spielberg and Lucas were way ahead of the curve on this.

Streaming church services, theatrical performances and other live events: Obviously nothing beats an in-person experience, but the convenience and wider accessibility provided by live streams (augmented with text, audio or video discussion rooms) is powerful, and will become a vital leg on the live event/community stool.

The attitude of American exceptionalism: From the massive bungling of our nation’s COVID response to the long overdue reckoning on institutional racism, many people have experience a forced recalibration to their sense of America’s place in the world. Let’s move forward with an attitude of humility and a desire for cooperation.